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For those who are interested in Competitive training such as Schutzhund, PSA, and AKC training.We are holding a competitors class only, which focuses on these types of training.

       Registration Fee: $200.00 (one time fee for the life of the dog!) 

 Competitor Class: $50.00 per phase session x (2)sessions

 Payment is Required at the end of Class

A Little About Schutzhund!

Schutzhund is a dog sport that was developed in Germany in the early 1900s to test whether German Shepherd Dogs(GSD) act and perform in the manner that the breed was intended, rather than simply evaluating a dog's appearance. Today, many breeds other than GSDs can compete in Schutzhund, but it is a demanding test for any dog and few of them can pass this kind of test.

Traits of Schutzhund Dogs

Schutzhund (German for "protection dog") tests dogs of all breeds for the traits necessary for police-type work. Dogs that pass Schutzhund tests should be suitable for a wide variety of tasks: police work, specific odor detection, search and rescue, and many others. The purpose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have, or do not have, the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are:

  • Strong desire to work
  • Courage
  • Intelligence
  • Trainability
  • Strong bond with the handler
  • Perseverance
  • Protective Instinct

Schutzhund training tests these traits. It also tests physical traits such as strength, endurance, agility, and scenting ability. The goal of Schutzhund is to illuminate the character of a dog through training. Breeders can use this insight to determine how and whether to use the dog in producing the next generation of working dogs.

History of dog breeds commonly used in Schutzhund

The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) was developed from working herding dogs around 1900 as an all-around working dog. Within a few years it was clear that the dogs were losing their working ability. Schutzhund was developed at this time as a test of working ability for GSDs. Only GSDs that had passed a Schutzhund test or a herding test were allowed to breed and thus have their progeny registered as German Shepherd Dogs. This is true in Germany to this day. It is only by testing the working ability of every generation that the strong working characteristics of the GSD have been maintained. Dogs of any breed, even mixes, can compete in Schutzhund today, but the most common breeds are GSDs, Belgian Malinois, Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, Giant Schnauzers, Bouvier des Flandres, Dutch Shepherd Dogs, American Bulldogs, and the like. But all dogs whether of mixed breed or not are encouraged to join Schutzhund and compete. 


 History of Schutzhund

In response to political forces in Germany, in 2004 the Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (SV) and the Deutscher Hundesportverein (DHV) made substantial changes to Schutzhund. The DHV adopted the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) rules that govern IPO titles, so that at least on paper the SV and DHV gave up control of the sport to the FCI. The DHV changed the name of the titles from "SchH" (Schutzhund) to "VPG" (Vielseitigkeitsprüfung für Gebrauchshunde which roughly translates Versatility examination for working dogs). The SV has retained the "SchH" title names, but otherwise conforms to the DHV/FCI rules.


There are three schutzhund titles: Schutzhund 1 (SchH1), Schutzhund 2 (SchH2), and Schutzhund 3 (SchH3). SchH1 is the first title and SchH3 is the most advanced. Additionally, before a dog can compete for a SchH1, he must pass a temperament testcalled a B or BH (Begleithundprüfung which translates as "traffic-sure companion dog test"). The B tests basic obedience, sureness around strange people, strange dogs, traffic, and loud noises. A dog that exhibits excessive fear or aggression cannot pass the B and so cannot go on to schutzhund.

The Schutzhund test has changed over the years. Modern Schutzhund consists of three phases: tracking, obedience, and protection. A dog must pass all three phases in one trial to be awarded a schutzhund title. Each phase is judged on a 100-point scale. The minimum passing score is 70. At any time the judge may dismiss a dog for showing poor temperament, including fear or aggression.


The Tracking Phase

In the tracking phase, a track-layer walks across a field, dropping several small articles along the way. After a period of time, the dog is directed to follow the track. When the dog finds each article he indicates it, usually by lying down with the article between his front paws. The dog is scored on how intently and carefully he follows the track and indicates the articles. The length, complexity, and age of the track varies for each title.


 The Obedience Phase

The obedience phase is done in a large field, with the dogs working in pairs. One dog is placed in a down position on the side of the field and his handler leaves him while the other dog works in the field. Then the dogs switch places. In the field, there are several heeling exercises, including heeling through a group of people. There are two or three gunshots during the heeling to test the dog's reaction to loud noises. There are one or two recalls, two or three retrieves, and a send out where the dog is directed to run away from the handler straight and fast and then lie down on command. Obedience is judged on the dog's accuracy and attitude. The dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that is uninterested or cowering scores poorly.


The Protection Phase

In the protection phase, the judge has an assistant, called the "helper", who helps him test the dog's courage to protect himself and his handler and his ability to be controlled while doing so. The helper wears a heavily padded sleeve on one arm. There are several blinds, placed where the helper can hide, on the field. The dog is directed to search the blinds for the helper. When he finds the helper, he indicates this by barking. The dog must guard the helper to prevent him from moving until recalled by his handler. There follows a series of exercises similar to police work where the handler searches the helper and transports him to the judge. At specified points, the helper either attacks the dog or the handler or attempts to escape. The dog must stop the attack or the escape by biting the padded sleeve. When the attack or escape stops, the dog is commanded to "out," or release the sleeve. The dog must out or he is dismissed. At all times the dog must show the courage to engage the helper and the temperament to obey his handler while in this high state of drive. Again, the dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that shows fear, lack of control, or inappropriate aggression is dismissed.


The largest Schutzhund organization in the US is the United Schutzhund Clubs of America, called Schuthund USA. In spite of its name, Schuthund USA is a German Dog club, but sponsors all-breed Schutzhund clubs and trials. The Working Dog Associationis a branch of another GSD breed club, the German Shepherd Dog Club of America, which also sponsors clubs and trials. There are a small number of DVG clubs in the United States, various other breed organizations that are involved in Schutzhund, and the American Working Dog Federation(AWDF), which is an umbrella organization. This barely scratches the surface.

 Schutzhund and Society

Most police departments do not allow their working dogs to breed. This is also true of many other organizations that use working dogs. The breeding stock for these working dogs are Schutzhund dogs. Without Schutzhund, the working ability of GSDs and other working breeds would quickly deteriorate and it would be difficult to find suitable dogs for police work, bomb detection, or search and rescue. People do Schutzhund for fun, but they also know that they are giving back to society by developing the next generation of working dogs.

If you are interested in joining this club, please let us know! 410.804.2714 or by

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